Indiana State University police train for worst case scenarios

Police lockdown the area after shots were fired on Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, on the campus of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind.  Officials at Purdue University say one person has been killed in a shooting at the campus classroom building. Purdue Provost Tim Sands says he didn't immediately know the identity of the person killed or the person's connection to the university. Campus police chief John Cox says the suspect is in custody after surrendering outside the Electrical Engineering Building following the shooting.   (AP Photo/Journal & Courier, John Terhune)
Police lockdown the area after shots were fired on Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014, on the campus of Purdue University in West Lafayette, Ind. Officials at Purdue University say one person has been killed in a shooting at the campus classroom building. Purdue Provost Tim Sands says he didn't immediately know the identity of the person killed or the person's connection to the university. Campus police chief John Cox says the suspect is in custody after surrendering outside the Electrical Engineering Building following the shooting. (AP Photo/Journal & Courier, John Terhune)

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (WTHI) – The campus of Purdue University was paralyzed for a short time Tuesday after one man shot and killed another.
    
Something of this nature always hits close to home.
    
One interesting thing we noted about this shooting was the proximity of campus police.
    
News 10 spoke to Indiana State University (ISU) police Wednesday about how they would respond in a similar scenario.
 
It took less than three minutes for Purdue University campus police to catch the shooting suspect after getting the initial dispatch.
    
News 10 spoke to ISU police who say they would hope they could respond just as quickly if a similar scenario were to happen.

“I think most of our emergency calls are well under a minute…an officer is always on campus, patrolling or on foot, or on bicycle patrol, but I think the response time would probably be consistent with what they had at Purdue,” said Joe Newport, interim ISU Chief of Police.

But this isn’t just a crap shoot for campus police. They prepare for this worst case scenario in twice-a-year drills.

“We have drills. We’re required to have one for Clary, however, the university president has asked us to do an additional one. So we do one each semester,” said Newport. “We train in a manner that our officers know how to clear buildings, they know how to enter.”
    
After much-publicized tragedies, such as this, people on campus are more aware of their surroundings, for a short time.

“We hear of things. There’s a heightened awareness about people that act peculiar. We get calls on that. But after a few weeks, it seems to wane,” said Newport.
         
So the best prevention is you, working with officials to keep each other safe.

“If we try to maintain, keeping an eye out for folks that may be trouble and to let the right people know on a campus,” said Newport. “Not only public safety. There’s a number of offices, counseling office and student conduct that all get involved in students’ behaviors.”

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