Non-melting black snow…what causes it?

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (WTHI) – There’s been a lot of talk lately.

Snow.

More specifically, how mysterious it is, and how if you put a flame to it, it doesn’t melt.

Storm Team 10’s Kevin Orpurt checks and sees if that’s really the case.

Kevin grabbed a butane lighter, and put it to some snow he grabbed from right outside the WTHI studio.

You would expect it to start dripping down the plate, but there is actually no dripping, but what’s happening is the snow is turning black and charred. It is sort of disappearing, but doesn’t seem to be dripping.

So what is actually happening?

Some people believe that the snow might have something to do with chemtrails or geoengineering, or something along those lines.

That is not really the case.

When Kevin puts the flame to the snow, it really is melting.

The snow, however, is full of a lot of air, so the snow that’s melting is going back into the pockets of air.

The reason we’re getting this soot, this sort of black color is because carbon is being produced by the flame.

That’s what we’re seeing here on the snow itself, and it smells like scorched Styrofoam or something mysterious like that.

That’s happening because of the product that comes from the flame itself.

It’s not mysterious snow at all, it’s real snow, but the science behind it is that snow is full of air.

This is what happens when you try to melt snow, it doesn’t drip, the snow actually melts and goes inside the snow itself.

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