Daviess Community Hospital touts new security measures for Women’s Health

WASHINGTON, Ind. (WTHI) – The Daviess Community Hospital Tuesday gave News 10 a short tour around its Women’s Health Facility; the hospital wing that serves as a nursery and labor delivery area for expecting mothers. The Hospital last week installed and started using a new finger print recognition device, that only allows doors to be opened by staffers with recognized finger print access.

“As far as the staff members coming into the unit then they have a keypad that they’ll just use their finger and their finger print will let them in then,” said Shawna O’Kelley Brinson, Director of O.B. And Nursery at Daviess Community Hospital. ”All the employees in the hospital were finger printed just recently for new finger prints and then those are all kept in a computerized system and then the ones that are needing access into OB have been granted that access into our system then.”

The new finger print recognition system joins an already functioning number of security features for the wing, including: security cameras, telephones, mirrors, and a tracking system. The tracking system, “Hugs and Kisses” places a device on mother and baby.

Hospital officials explained when the baby’s tracking device gets to close to the wing’s exit doors, it automatically locks the doors from the inside, keeping anyone trying to transport the baby out of the wing from doing so.

“Hugs And Kisses” also protects baby, according to hospital officials, from becoming the victim of a more than one person abduction. If a wing door is held open and the tracking device gets to close to the door, it sets off an alarm.

“If for any reason a whole team of people we’re to work together to try to abduct an infant and the baby leaves that, it shows on the computer system which baby just left the door,” added O’Kelley Brinson.

The device also keeps baby’s identified with their mothers. All of the security measures are not in response a prior event; rather the measures are in place to keep mother comfortable during delivery.

“Thankfully, we’ve never had a problem here, we’ve had other security measures here in the past,” said O’Kelley Brinson. “You know the world’s changing obviously but we just want to make sure babies are very secure in our hospital”

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