Bullying doesn’t stop in the hallways


WABASH VALLEY, Ind. (WTHI) – More than half of all American teens experience it.

“I was bullied as a child. I’ve always been overweight, and as a child, I learned every name there was to be called,” said Dr. Eric Yancy, bullying prevention advocate.

These hallways fill with hundreds of students daily. But bullying no longer stops here.

Now, it can affect you while sitting at a desk in front of a computer screen.

“The fact you can actually make a comment and ten thousand, a hundred thousand, a million people can see what you said in a split second, has added a whole new dimension, a whole new layer to it,” said Dr. Yancy.

Dr. Yancy sees it firsthand in his job.

Bullying affects growth and development. That’s why prevention is even more important than ever before.

“The problems with bullying are just magnified. You’ve seen suicides. There’s a lot of discussion about whether some shootings were triggered by repeated bullying and a child feeling like they have no way out,” said Dr. Yancy.

Education and awareness are not enough with the added means of communication. Experts want parents to get behind the effort.

“The other thing that can happen, which is very dangerous, they can actually become very angry, then either become a bully themselves or sometimes take retribution on the bullies, which is far beyond what they actually are bullied with.”

Dr. Yancy says it all comes down to knowing what your child is doing.

“If your child’s on the computer four or five hours a day, on the weekends, eight or nine hours, you have to know what’s going on,” said Dr. Yancy.

“Parents actually have to then say, I need to know what you’re doing, I need to see what you’re doing. You don’t really get that level of secrecy as a minor, as a child,” said Dr. Yancy.

Keeping your child’s world a no bullying zone.

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