Turner: No violation of House ethics rules

State Sen. Richardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens, left, gestures to a chart showing which gifts that lawmakers would be prohibited from accepting under a proposed package of bills intended to impose new rules on public officials, during a Capitol news conference in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday March 6,  2014.  The three-bill package, called the California Accountability in Public Service Act, would prohibit legislators and their employees from accepting most entertainment-related gifts, such as tickets to sporting events, concerts, golf outings, spa treatments and tickets to amusement and theme parks. The package of bills comes after one Democratic senator was convicted for voter fraud and perjury and another was indicted on federal corruption charges alleging he took bribes while in office.  Also seen are Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento, second from left,  Sen. Kevin de Leon,  D-Los Angeles, third from left, Ellen Corbett, D-San Leandro, and Sen. Jerry Hill, of San Mateo, right.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
State Sen. Richardo Lara, D-Bell Gardens, left, gestures to a chart showing which gifts that lawmakers would be prohibited from accepting under a proposed package of bills intended to impose new rules on public officials, during a Capitol news conference in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday March 6, 2014. The three-bill package, called the California Accountability in Public Service Act, would prohibit legislators and their employees from accepting most entertainment-related gifts, such as tickets to sporting events, concerts, golf outings, spa treatments and tickets to amusement and theme parks. The package of bills comes after one Democratic senator was convicted for voter fraud and perjury and another was indicted on federal corruption charges alleging he took bribes while in office. Also seen are Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg, D-Sacramento, second from left, Sen. Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, third from left, Ellen Corbett, D-San Leandro, and Sen. Jerry Hill, of San Mateo, right.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A powerful Indiana Republican lawmaker says he didn’t violate ethics rules during a nursing home battle this past session.

House Speaker Pro Tem Eric Turner said Wednesday he’s confident the House Ethics Committee will determine he didn’t break any rules.

House Speaker Brian Bosma has called for an ethics review following reports that Turner had lobbied in private against a nursing home ban that would have hurt his family’s business.

House Ethics Chairman Greg Steuerwald (STUR’-wald) said the committee could meet as soon as the second week in April to consider Turner’s case.

Turner’s son develops nursing homes throughout the state and his business would have suffered under a construction moratorium that was under consideration. The ban died in the final days of the session.

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