Signals ‘consistent’ with black box, no link confirmed

Australian defense ship Ocean Shield lies docked at naval base HMAS Stirling while being fitted with a towed pinger locator to aid in her roll in the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in Perth, Australia, Sunday, March 30, 2014.  The Australian warship with an aircraft black box detector was set to depart Sunday to join the search. It will still take three to four days for the ship, the Ocean Shield, to reach the search zone — an area roughly the size of Poland about 1,850 kilometers (1,150 miles) to the west of Australia. (AP Photo/Rob Griffith)
Australian defense ship Ocean Shield lies docked at naval base HMAS Stirling while being fitted with a towed pinger locator to aid in her roll in the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in Perth, Australia, Sunday, March 30, 2014. The Australian warship with an aircraft black box detector was set to depart Sunday to join the search. It will still take three to four days for the ship, the Ocean Shield, to reach the search zone — an area roughly the size of Poland about 1,850 kilometers (1,150 miles) to the west of Australia. (AP Photo/Rob Griffith)

PERTH, Australia (AP) — 2:54 PM UPDATE: The joint agency coordinating the search for the Malaysian jetliner says electronic pulse signals reportedly detected by a Chinese ship in the southern Indian Ocean are consistent with those of an aircraft’s “black box.”

But Australian Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston says the agency cannot verify any connection between the signals and Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. He also says the agency has no confirmation that white floating objects spotted by a Chinese search plane are related to the missing plane.

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China’s official news agency says a Chinese ship that is part of the multinational search effort looking for the missing Malaysia Airlines plane has detected a “pulse signal” in southern Indian Ocean waters.

The report says a black box detector deployed by the vessel picked up a signal at 37.5Hz per second Saturday at around 25 degrees south latitude and 101 degrees east longitude.

The report said it was not established whether that the signal was related to the missing jet.

The Australian government agency coordinating the search would not immediately comment on the report.

Military and civilian planes, ships with deep-sea searching equipment and a British nuclear submarine are scouring a remote patch of the southern Indian Ocean off Australia’s west coast in an increasingly urgent hunt for debris and the flight recorders that hold vital information about Malaysia Airlines Flight 370’s last hours.

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