GM to begin repairing vehicles linked to recall

Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., ranking member of the House Oversight and Investigations subcommittee, holds up a GM ignition switch while she questions General Motors CEO Mary Barra on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. The committee is looking for answers from Barra about safety defects and mishandled recall of 2.6 million small cars with a faulty ignition switch that's been linked to 13 deaths and dozen of crashes. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., ranking member of the House Oversight and Investigations subcommittee, holds up a GM ignition switch while she questions General Motors CEO Mary Barra on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. The committee is looking for answers from Barra about safety defects and mishandled recall of 2.6 million small cars with a faulty ignition switch that's been linked to 13 deaths and dozen of crashes. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Beginning Monday, General Motors will start repairing millions of vehicles to fix a faulty ignition switch. The problem has been tied to at least 13 deaths. And questions about why the recall hadn’t been issued sooner, had Congress grilling the the company’s CEO last week.

The faulty switch can shut off a car and turn off safety features if it gets bumped out of place. Now, car dealers will be putting in replacement ignition switches, free of charge as part of the recall.

Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., ranking member of the House Oversight and Investigations subcommittee, holds up a GM ignition switch while she questions General Motors CEO Mary Barra on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, April 1, 2014. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The problem is, a reported GM memo shows the company signed off on the new switch back in 2006, but the part number was never changed. Now, federal investigators and capital leaders are wondering why the cars continued to be on the road the past nine years, despite the safety concerns.

The recall affects models during the years 2003-2007. Such as, the:

  • Chevrolet Cobalt and HHR
  • Pontiac G5 and Solstice
  • Saturn Ion and Sky

Even though General Motors no longer produces the Pontiac or Saturn brands, motorists can still take their car to any GM dealership.

If you do own of those vehicles, you’re asked to call your dealership and ask if they can set up an appointment.

GM said the repair should only take about 30 minutes.

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