Wrongfully Convicted: David Camm speaks at ISU

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (WTHI) – Two men who spent decades in prison before being set free shared their stories with the Wabash Valley on Wednesday. For the first time since being found not guilty of killing his family, David Camm spoke to the public about his trials, time in prison and acquittal. “It feels like a blessing,” David Camm responded when asked what freedom feels like. The road to freedom was long and proved to be challenging. VIDEO | Extended interview with David Camm Camm’s life would change forever on the night of September 28, 2000 when he found his wife Kim and his young children murdered in their Southern Indiana home. “It was flawed from the very beginning because you had experienced police officers arriving and within five minutes saying that this was a Dave Camm crime,” said Camm. Through 13 years and two overturned convictions, it became one of the most outrageous murder cases in Indiana history. “Did the proper outcome eventually become reached? Yes. Is the right person in prison for the rest of his life? Yes. Am I free? Yes. You shouldn’t have to go through three trials with three different prosecutors, and the county spends millions of dollars to get to the point where you reach the conclusion that should have been reached in 2001,” said Camm. In October of 2013, Camm would hear the words he’d been longing to hear for 13 years: “Not guilty.” It’s been six months since his exoneration, but escaping skepticism proves almost impossible. “If they want to be ignorant and don’t want to educate themselves, or presume that I had something to do with this that’s up to them, but I’m moving forward,” said Camm. Part of moving forward is sharing his story in a public setting for the first time. “I feel an obligation. I have a story to be told. People need to recognize that there is a lot of injustice in our justice system,” said Camm. He is now working for the non-profit, Investigating Innocence, studying cases across the country. In doing so, Camm hopes to save others from going through the same experience he did by being wrongfully convicted. “I just consider it a blessing to be alive and be free, and I’m doing my best to make the best of it,” said Camm. Since January 2006, Charles Boney has been behind bars for the murder of Camm’s wife and their two young children.

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