State Republicans praise Common Core replacement

In this photo taken on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, Common Core standards are posted on a bulletin board in a second grade classroom at George Buck Elementary School in Indianapolis. The national math and education standards outlined in the Common Core are everywhere at Buck Elementary. Stapled packets of the standards hang outside classroom doors, and individual guidelines are cut out and displayed in the hallways next to hand-drawn graphs scribbled in crayon. A bill signed last Monday by Gov. Mike Pence makes Indiana the first state to revoke those standards, but what will replace them is unclear in a state where teachers are still reeling from years of change. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)
In this photo taken on Tuesday, March 25, 2013, Common Core standards are posted on a bulletin board in a second grade classroom at George Buck Elementary School in Indianapolis. The national math and education standards outlined in the Common Core are everywhere at Buck Elementary. Stapled packets of the standards hang outside classroom doors, and individual guidelines are cut out and displayed in the hallways next to hand-drawn graphs scribbled in crayon. A bill signed last Monday by Gov. Mike Pence makes Indiana the first state to revoke those standards, but what will replace them is unclear in a state where teachers are still reeling from years of change. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — State Republican leaders are praising newly approved education standards to replace the Common Core benchmarks in Indiana’s classrooms this fall.

The board voted 10-1 Monday morning to endorse the new education standards in a step that makes Indiana the first state to formally abandon the national benchmarks that had been adopted by 45 states.

Some conservatives and Tea Party members say the Common Core cedes too much power to the federal government.

Indiana state Senate President Pro Tem David Long says the adoption of these standards prevents that.

Lawmakers passed legislation in March requiring the board adopt new standards written by Indiana education leaders to replace those contentious national standards.

House Speaker Brian Bosma says it’s now important to monitor their implementation and ensure students can compete globally.

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