Housing for homeless Veterans proposed

TERRE HAUTE, Ind. (WTHI) - According to the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, nearly one in four veterans are homeless. This includes many here in the Wabash Valley.

A Terre Haute non-profit has a project in mind to help fill that void.

One of the largest vacant lots in Terre Haute is at 25th and Elm Streets, and it’s owned by the city Department of Redevelopment.  The good news is that a proposed housing project for homeless veterans could soon be coming to this plot of land.

“The homeless veteran circumstances in Terre Haute are pretty significant.  We’ve talked to the VA about projects like this in the past,” said Redevelopment Director Cliff Lambert.

These are preliminary plans for what will be called “Liberty Village.”  This housing project will be 30-units that will be owned and operated by the Mental Health Association.

“We had over 200 homeless veterans in 2013 that we were able to identify,” said Myra Wilkey, who also says her organization has been working hand-in-hand with city redevelopment to find a suitable location for this project.

With support from local government officials, this project will take huge steps forward this week, making it that much closer to becoming a reality.

“If we can find a way to be supportive and utilize federal, state and local monies to improve the quality of place in our community, then we’re thrilled to be able to do that,’ Lambert concluded.

When this project went before the Area Planning Commission, some members brought up concerns with this project.  Area Plan Director Darren Maher says those concerns have been addressed.  The City Council will consider the rezoning of this property at their Thursday night meeting.

The Liberty Village project will be the latest in a city wide plan to re-develop neighborhoods in Terre Haute.

We checked in on the Warren Village Project this week and judging from the construction it looks to be nearing completion.

The idea in both projects remains the same: provide the citizens first, and then let nature take its course.

“As we re-invigorate that neighborhood there will be businesses wanting to locate there, restaurants, convenience stores and the like,” Lambert said.

“We’ll work in a very supportive way with those small businesses who want to serve that increased population in that area.”

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