Police: Greene County severe weather ‘best case possible’

BLOOMFIELD, Ind. (WTHI) – While state and local officials worked Wednesday to determine if a Tuesday severe weather outbreak would be ruled as a tornado, The Greene County Sheriff’s Department said the way the event was handled was a best case scenario.

Just after 8 p.m. Tuesday, the National Weather Service issued an alert that a severe thunderstorm heading towards Greene County showed a radar indicated rotation. Storm Team 10 corroborated, that while a weather event is picked up on radar, it does not confirm tornadic activity. Still though, the reports of a possible tornado sent the Greene County Sheriff’s Office into its severe weather response mode.

Greene County Chief Deputy, Major Mike Hasler explained that when severe weather is imminent, a team of deputies are focused in areas where a storm is predicted to occur. Hasler noted there’s a constant communication dialogue created between Greene County Dispatch, and the Greene County Emergency Management Agency.

With teams in place, Hasler explained, all eyes turned to the sky, however, for the most part, all eyes would remain in the sky.

“We believe them to be just funnel clouds that were attempting to form, but just didn’t get it together,” said Hasler. The Chief Deputy was one of several police staffers geared towards sky watching and said he saw several clouds, but nothing that appeared to make a touch down.

“Immediately the 911 Center became very active with people calling in reports of what they were seeing,” said Hasler.

Around town on Wednesday, News 10 spoke to several passersby on what they heard and saw. Two major areas became residual themes. The first, was Antioch Road, at Baseline Road south of the city. And another hot spot for possible severe weather activity was Blue Barn Road.

Greene County Emergency Management took reports Tuesday night of damage in the Antioch Road area, though the only noticeable damage were broken branches alongside the road. On Baseline Road, which intersects Antioch, a small circular pattern carved into the grass was visible, with a trail of smashed grass for about 30 feet. Storm Team 10 believes the action could indicate a convergence of wind, however, nothing official was reported in this area.

Another spot with possible reported damage was the area around the Richland-Plummer Creek Covered Bridge. While some grass in the area looked like it had been pushed aside by a strong wind, no other major damage was visible. The Covered Bridge itself appeared to have a damaged side with siding missing, but News 10 could not confirm whether the damage was the result of the storm.

Greene County EMA and the Sheriff’s Office both noted that the result of the storm did not produce evidence suggesting a touch down.

“We didn’t really have any damage that you would normally find,” said Hasler “This was the best type of storm to go through like that, everyone was aware that we could make aware to take cover in case something did form, fortunately nothing came out of this storm.”

As a precautionary measure, storm sirens were sounded in Bloomfield. The siren activation was requested by the National Weather Service.

 

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