Taking a summer vacation? Make sure you don’t get scammed

FILE - In this Jan. 20, 2012, file photo, passengers queue up for a security check at Pudong International Airport in Shanghai, China. The Transportation Security Administration is requiring passengers at some overseas airports that offer U.S.-bound flights to power on their electronic devices, the agency said Sunday, July 6, 2014. It says devices that won’t power up won’t be allowed on planes, and those travelers may have to undergo additional screening. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 20, 2012, file photo, passengers queue up for a security check at Pudong International Airport in Shanghai, China. The Transportation Security Administration is requiring passengers at some overseas airports that offer U.S.-bound flights to power on their electronic devices, the agency said Sunday, July 6, 2014. It says devices that won’t power up won’t be allowed on planes, and those travelers may have to undergo additional screening. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

WABASH VALLEY, Ind. (WTHI) – For a lot of people, summer means it’s vacation time. Travelers are hitting the road and taking off.

But vacation scams can give you more than you bargained for if you aren’t careful.

Vacationers are usually happy go-lucky and therefore might not pay as close attention to their personal belongings and safety.

This is when problems can occur.

We’ve all heard of greedy pick-pocketers…But that’s not the only problem that can affect the fun. According to better business bureau, vacation scams can cost vacationers over $10 billion each year.

Forgetting to take the proper precautions before and during vacation can end up taking you where you didn’t want to go.

Annette Trotter with Turner Motor Coach in Terre Haute gives specific tips for summer travelers.

“I would recommend you utilizing travel resources such as convention and visitor bureaus state tourism organizations or a local travel motor coach or travel company such as our selves,” she said.

To avoid other bad situations she suggests simply protecting yourself as you would if you were in an unfamiliar place at home.

“It’s just using general street smarts. Knowing your surroundings, knowing where you’re at and where you’re possessions are at all times,” she said.

An Experian’s ProtectMyID® survey reveals that 30% of people have experienced identity theft while traveling.

That survey also shows:

  • Nearly 1 in 5 travelers report having sensitive information lost or stolen
  • Only 39 percent of travelers alert their debit/credit card providers before departing, and only 33 percent notify their bank
  • Just one in three travelers use passwords to protect their smartphones
  • More than a quarter (27 percent) of people bring their social security card with them while traveling

 

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